why did the articles of impeachment not stand up against president johnson?

why did the articles of impeachment not stand up against president johnson?

why did the articles of impeachment not stand up against president johnson?

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Why did the articles of impeachment not stand up against President Johnson?

A. The issues they addressed were much too vague.
B. He resigned before they could take him to court.
C. The Senate had made up a bunch of lies about him.
D. There was no Constitutional backing for them.

why did the articles of impeachment not stand up against president johnson?
why did the articles of impeachment not stand up against president johnson?

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Johnson Impeached, February to March 1868

As the presidential election year of 1868 opened, President Johnson continued to wage guerrilla warfare against Congressional Reconstruction. The House’s refusal to go forward with impeachment in December 1867 only seemed to embolden him. While Johnson made sure not to give moderate Republicans any grounds on which to impeach him by violating the law, he walked right up to that line. “The President . . . does continue to do the most provoking things,” complained moderate Republican Henry L. Dawes of Massachusetts. “If he isn’t impeached it won’t be his fault.”

On January 11, 1868, Republicans experienced a brief victory when Grant stepped down as Secretary of War and Stanton resumed his post. The Senate had disapproved of Stanton’s firing when it came back into session in late 1867, and Grant quickly gave up the office. Outraged, Johnson not only opened a public feud with Grant, he began casting about for another replacement.

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Although impeachment appeared to have gone dormant in the House by early 1868, some Members quietly planned to renew the effort. For one, Thaddeus Stevens, the Republican leader, decided to take a more direct role in the impeachment campaign still being stoked by Radicals. Stevens was in the twilight of his life, and his body had started to fail. He was nearly 76 years old and displayed little of the vigor that had made him such a formidable figure in the House.

Suffering from severe stomach pain, liver problems, and edema, the fearsome Radical leader was now so infirm that he rarely spoke on the floor. When he did address the chamber, he faded so quickly that he often had to ask the Clerk or another Member to read his remarks. Some speculated that only Stevens’s visceral hatred of President Johnson kept him alive.

why did the articles of impeachment not stand up against president johnson?
why did the articles of impeachment not stand up against president johnson?

The Fight Over Andrew Johnson’s Impeachment Was a Fight for the Future of the United States

It promised to be a spectacle in a period that had seen its share of them. Three years after the end of a bloody civil war that had sundered the Union, and nearly three years after the assassination of Abraham Lincoln, the government of the United States had triggered the most serious process in the constitutional mechanism: the power of impeachment.

On February 24, 1868, the House of Representatives voted along party lines, 126 to 47, to impeach President Andrew Johnson for having committed “high crimes and misdemeanors.” Days later, a House committee drew up nine articles of impeachment against the 17th president. They would later add two more. The vast majority of the articles were related to the main charge against Johnson: that he had violated the Tenure of Office Act, which prohibited the president from removing, without Senate approval, any official who had been appointed to office “with the advice and consent of the Senate.”

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Congress had enacted the law to check Johnson’s behavior. The Tennessean, who had remained loyal to the Union, called Southerners who rebelled “traitors” and said forcefully that “treason must be punished,” changed his harsh tune once he became president after Lincoln’s death. He embarked upon a program of conciliation toward the white South, emboldening the former Confederates in ways that angered members of Congress and many Northerners as well. His decision to fire the secretary of war, Edwin M. Stanton, with whom he had political disagreements, was simply the last of what Congress considered to be Johnson’s long train of abuses.

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