which of the following exemplifies an intrinsic reward?

which of the following exemplifies an intrinsic reward?

which of the following exemplifies an intrinsic reward?

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Which of the following exemplifies an intrinsic reward?

A) Richard enjoys his job and sees it as a chance to learn something new.
B) Samantha receives a cash reward for good job performance.
C) Dorothy gets promoted at work.
D) Rani receives an annual bonus.

Intrinsic Rewards: What They Are and Why They’re Important

If you’re a manager, it’s likely keeping your employees motivated is among your top concerns. This is especially true in competitive industries, like sales and technology, and those where people have to do a lot of routine tasks, like manufacturing or office administration. Understanding intrinsic rewards is tantamount to driving results. In this article, we define intrinsic rewards and explain their role in creating an effective workplace to learn and grow by offering intrinsic rewards examples.

which of the following exemplifies an intrinsic reward?
which of the following exemplifies an intrinsic reward?

What are intrinsic rewards?

There are two broad categories of rewards that managers might keep in their toolkit to increase motivation among team members; these are extrinsic and intrinsic rewards.

Extrinsic rewards are ones that you’re more likely to notice in the workplace because they include tangible rewards, like a monetary bonus or an extra day off of work. Intrinsic rewards are harder to identify because they vary from person to person, and they aren’t tangible. Intrinsic rewards include things like a sense of pride, personal fulfillment from completion of an activity, gaining a new skill and feeling like an important part of a team.

Why are intrinsic rewards important?

There are two broad categories of rewards that managers might keep in their toolkit to increase motivation among team members—extrinsic and intrinsic rewards. Extrinsic rewards include tangible rewards such as a monetary bonus or an extra day off of work. They are controlled by people other than you. Intrinsic rewards are intangible, psychological rewards that you get from a job well done. These vary from person to person and include things like a sense of pride, personal fulfillment from completing an activity, gaining a new skill and feeling like an important part of a team.

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Intrinsic rewards examples in the workplace

Below are some intrinsic rewards that may impact your workforce. Fostering these activities and feelings in the work environment could help your team grow and thrive:

  • Completing meaningful tasks

  • Letting employees be selective

  • Gaining a sense of competence

  • Making noticeable progress

  • Feeling inspired to be more responsible

  • Being an important part of an organization or team

  • Feeling accomplished

  • Mastery of knowledge or a skill

  • Feeling pride

Intrinsic Motivation: 3 Things that Motivate Employees More Than Money

Although money can be an effective way to motivate employees, it’s not the only way to keep employees happy and engaged. There are other types of motivation that are better suited for the modern workplace in 2022.

In 2009, Daniel Pink, a career analyst and former speechwriter for Al Gore, gave a 20-minute TED Talk on the puzzle of motivation. We hope you don’t mind us referencing something this old, but we think many business leaders would benefit from listening to his ideas when considering ways to motivate their team.

In it, Pink explains why financial incentives often don’t work in 21st century environments where problem-solving and cognitive thinking are more important than mechanical skill.

which of the following exemplifies an intrinsic reward?
which of the following exemplifies an intrinsic reward?

Intrinsic motivation is more powerful than extrinsic motivation

Time and again, researchers have found that people with high intrinsic motivation (i.e., they are driven by internal rewards and satisfaction) perform much better than people offered high extrinsic motivation (i.e., external rewards).

Pink argues that if companies can help their employees find intrinsic motivation then they will have a more sustainable motivation to work hard and succeed, which means they will be more productive, add more value to the business, and be less likely to resign.

How can you use intrinsic rewards to drive employee motivation?

Pink highlights three keys to intrinsic motivation: autonomy, mastery, and purpose.

Autonomy

People are happier when they are given the freedom to make their own decisions about how to live and work.

CIPHR explains that, “Employees who are free to make their own choices about how they go about their responsibilities are happier, committed, productive, and loyal. Autonomy may also be the most important factor when nurturing a culture of engagement within a company.”

Employees who have the freedom to make their own decisions at the office tend to be more motivated because they understand that they are responsible for their own success or failure – which drives them to work harder.

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Other benefits of employee autonomy include:

  • Happier, more engaged, and more loyal team members
  • Greater productivity in individual performance and the overall team performance
  • A greater desire to try new things and to be proactive in learning

All of the above leads to a better, more positive company culture, because people learn to take responsibility for their own actions and their own happiness.

The intrinsic rewards in today’s work

To identify these intrinsic rewards, we began by analyzing the nature of today’s work. Basically, most of today’s workers are asked to self-manage to a significant degree—to use their intelligence and experience to direct their work activities to accomplish important organizational purposes. This is how today’s employees add value—innovating, problem solving and improvising to meet the conditions they encounter to meet customers’ needs.

which of the following exemplifies an intrinsic reward?
which of the following exemplifies an intrinsic reward?

In turn, we found that the self-management process involves four key steps:

  1. Committing to a meaningful purpose
  2. Choosing the best way of fulfilling that purpose
  3. Making sure that one is performing work activities competently, and
  4. Making sure that one is making progress to achieving the purpose.

Each of these steps requires workers to make a judgment—about the meaningfulness of their purpose, the degree of choice they have for doing things the right way, the competence of their performance, and the actual progress being made toward fulfilling the purpose. These four judgments are the key factors in workers’ assessments of the value and effectiveness of their efforts—and the contribution they are making.

When positive, each of these judgments is accompanied by a positive emotional charge. These positive charges are the intrinsic rewards that employees get from work, ranging in size from quiet satisfaction to an exuberant “Yes!” They are the reinforcements that keep employees actively self-managing and engaged in their work.

The following are descriptions of the four intrinsic rewards and how workers view them:

  • Sense of meaningfulness. This reward involves the meaningfulness or importance of the purpose you are trying to fulfill. You feel that you have an opportunity to accomplish something of real value—something that matters in the larger scheme of things. You feel that you are on a path that is worth your time and energy, giving you a strong sense of purpose or direction.
  • Sense of choice. You feel free to choose how to accomplish your work—to use your best judgment to select those work activities that make the most sense to you and to perform them in ways that seem appropriate. You feel ownership of your work, believe in the approach you are taking, and feel responsible for making it work.
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  • Sense of competence. You feel that you are handling your work activities well—that your performance of these activities meets or exceeds your personal standards, and that you are doing good, high-quality work. You feel a sense of satisfaction, pride, or even artistry in how well you handle these activities.
  • Sense of progress. You are encouraged that your efforts are really accomplishing something. and You feel that your work is on track and moving in the right direction. also You see convincing signs that things are working out, giving you confidence in the choices you have made and confidence in the future.
which of the following exemplifies an intrinsic reward?
which of the following exemplifies an intrinsic reward?

Levels of intrinsic rewards

Professor Walter Tymon (Villanova University) and I developed and refined a measure of the four intrinsic rewards, now available as the Work Engagement Profile.5 Together with our colleagues, we have used it for research, training, and interventions in a number of organizations in the U.S., Canada, and India.

We found it useful to break down each reward into three levels—high (the top 25% of our norm sample), middle-range (middle 50%), and low (bottom 25%).

High-range scorers experience the four intrinsic rewards most intensely. These rewards are highly energizing and engaging.

Middle-range scorers experience these same rewards to a more moderate degree—as somewhat positive but limited. For example, their work may seem reasonably meaningful when they stop to think of it; they may have a fair amount of choice but have to live with some decisions that don’t make sense to them; they may feel they do most things pretty well but not a few others; and they may feel they are making some progress but less than they would like. They experience these reward levels as moderately energizing and engaging—enough to put in a “fair day’s work,” but end up feeling less satisfied than they would like.

Low-range scorers are dissatisfied with many aspects of their work. They may feel their work is relatively meaningless or pointless, that they are unable to make or influence decisions about how to do their work, are unable to perform work activities very well, and are making little or no headway. Experiencing these feelings drains the workers of energy and they are likely to become cynical and resentful about their job over time.

 

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