is the bladder part of the digestive system

is the bladder part of the digestive system

is the bladder part of the digestive system

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digestive system

is the bladder part of the digestive system
is the bladder part of the digestive system

What is the digestive system?

Your digestive system is made up of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract and your liver, pancreas and gallbladder. The GI tract is a series of hollow organs that are connected to each other from your mouth to your anus. The organs that make up your GI tract, in the order that they are connected, include your mouth, esophagus, stomach, small intestine, large intestine and anus.

What does the digestive system do?

Your digestive system is uniquely constructed to do its job of turning your food into the nutrients and energy you need to survive. And when it’s done with that, it handily packages your solid waste, or stool, for disposal when you have a bowel movement.

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Why is digestion important?

Digestion is important because your body needs nutrients from the food you eat and the liquids you drink in order to stay healthy and function properly. Nutrients include carbohydrates, proteins, fats, vitamins, minerals and water. Your digestive system breaks down and absorbs nutrients from the food and liquids you consume to use for important things like energy, growth and repairing cells.

is the bladder part of the digestive system
is the bladder part of the digestive system

What organs make up the digestive system?

The main organs that make up the digestive system (in order of their function) are the mouth, esophagus, stomach, small intestine, large intestine, rectum and anus. Helping them along the way are the pancreas, gall bladder and liver.

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The Gastrointestinal and Urinary Systems

Any body system requires ENERGY, this comes from the food and liquid we INGEST. The gastrointestinal system enables the body to DIGEST complex food substances which need to be broken down into simpler forms so that they can be utilised by the body’s cells. The gastrointestinal system must also remove WASTE together with the urinary system. The urinary system is also important for maintaining the correct composition and volume of body fluids including blood.

Summary of the Gastrointestinal System

The Alimentary Canal is a continuous tube from mouth to anus, sometimes known as the DIGESTIVE TRACT. There are three main sections:

  • The mouth cavity, pharynx, oesophagus and stomach
  • The Small Intestine (duodenum, jejunum, and ileum)
  • The Large Intestine (caecum, colon, and rectum)

Food is taken in at the mouth, chewed and swallowed. It travels whilst being digested through the pharynx and then down the oesophagus into the stomach. where further digestion occurs. It then travels into the small intestine where it is digested and absorbed, and finally into the large intestine where water is absorbed and waste is excreted through the anus.

Functions of the Gastrointestinal and Urinary Systems

Any body system requires ENERGY, this comes from the food and liquid we INGEST. The gastrointestinal system enables the body to DIGEST complex food substances which need to be broken down into simpler forms so that they can be utilised by the body’s cells. The gastrointestinal system must also remove WASTE together with the urinary system. The urinary system is also important for maintaining the correct composition and volume of body fluids including blood.

Summary of the Gastrointestinal System

The Alimentary Canal is a continuous tube from mouth to anus, sometimes known as the DIGESTIVE TRACT. There are three main sections:

  • The mouth cavity, pharynx, oesophagus and stomach
  • The Small Intestine (duodenum, jejunum, and ileum)
  • The Large Intestine (caecum, colon, and rectum)

Food is taken in at the mouth, chewed and swallowed. It travels whilst being digested through the pharynx and then down the oesophagus into the stomach. where further digestion occurs. It then travels into the small intestine where it is digested and absorbed, and finally into the large intestine where water is absorbed and waste is excreted through the anus.

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is the bladder part of the digestive system
is the bladder part of the digestive system

The mouth cavity, pharynx, esophagus and stomach

The Mouth.
Ingestion (taking in of food) starts with the mouth. Teeth cut and grind food into smaller particles. Tongue and teeth MASTICATE (hold and chew) food breaking it down into smaller particles. The tongue is composed of SKELETAL muscle covered by mucous membrane, and helps when swallowing. The TASTE BUDS are located in the mucous membrane, when stimulated by food a nervous signal is sent which causes the salivary and gastric glands to secrete saliva. Saliva helps lubricate and moisten food, but also contains ENZYMES that begin to digest food while it is still in the mouth.
The pharynx
is a mucusulomembranus sack like structure which acts as a passageway for chewed food, and as an airway during respiration.
The oesophagus
is a long narrow mucusulomembranus tube, about 10 inches long. It is very flexible and stretches from the pharynx to the stomach. It propels food down to the stomach by a wavelike movement of the esophagus muscles.
Sphincters
are bands of ring like muscle that act as gateways to natural openings or ‘orifices’ at various locations in the body. The muscles close the opening by contracting, and open it by relaxing. The cardiac sphincter is at the base of the oesophagus near the heart, it relaxes to allow food to enter the stomach.
The Stomach
is a muscular, curved pouch like structure. It churns food and mixes it with various lubricating and digestive secretions. Food enters from the esophagus via the cardiac sphincter and is sent to the small intestine via the PYLORIC Sphincter.

 

The Small Intestine of the digestive system , liver, gallbladder, and pancreas

The duodenum
is the first section of the small intestine. It is about 10 inches long. BILE from the Gallbladder and PANCREATIC secretions from the pancreas enter into the duodenum to digest food.
The jejunum
is the second section of the small intestine, further enzymes are secreted here, which aid digestion.
The ileum
is the longest section of the small intestine, where the bulk of food absorption takes place. Absorption of nutrients etc. through the mucus membrane via capillaries enter the blood stream for circulation.
The liver
is the largest gland in the body weighing about 3 lbs. It is a gland in the sense that it secretes BILE. It is also essential in the Metabolism of proteins, fats and carbohydrates.
The gallbladder
stores bile secreted by the liver until needed in the ileum.
The pancreas
is a long narrow, lobed gland that is located behind the stomach. The pancreas secretes substances that aid digestion (PANCREATIC JUICE), and two hormones; insulin and glucagen which play an important role in the ENDOCRINE system.
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is the bladder part of the digestive system
is the bladder part of the digestive system

The Large Intestine of the digestive system

Once food is absorbed in the ileum, the residue is passed into the large intestine. This is between five and six feet long ! and divided into three sections:

The caecum
lies between the ileum and the colon. The appendix is attached to the caecum, the appendix no longer serves any real function and can be removed without any ill effects.
The colon
is divided into four sections: the Ascending, the Transverse, the Descending, and the Sigmoid (S shaped) colon. Once the excess water which is a by-product of digestion has been absorbed by the colon the solid waste is passed to the rectum.
The rectum
is about 7 to 8 inches long. The upper part is lined with mucous membrane arranged in multiple upright folds. The last inch of the rectum is known as the ANAL CANAL, the external opening is the ANUS, which is controlled by the internal and external anal sphincters.

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